Beovision 8800

(1980-1983) 26” colour television, remote control, 1x14W, optional teletext decoder, optional A/V interface

Type numbers: 3309, 3311, 3312, 3320, 3321, 3331, 3332, 3342, 3351, 3361, 3371, 3372, 3409, 3411, 3412

Picture by Nick Jarman

Description

The Beovision 8800 was the key model in a new series of Beovision sets that would remain in the range for a good part of the 1980s. Based around the new Philips/Mullard 30AX colour tube, the Beovision 8800 set new standards for performance and reliability. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

For such a large set, the Beovision 8800 was remarkably slim. The 30AX tube, like most colour tubes used by B&O, had a scanning angle of 110 degrees and a short neck, allowing a really shallow cabinet to be built around it. The cabinet was constructed from quality materials at both the front and the back and well styled from all angles so the set could be placed in the middle of a room without becoming an eyesore. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

The sound performance also exceeded expectations. Two loudspeakers, a quality 4” woofer (with rubber roll edge) and a 1” cone tweeter, were fitted, the woofer in a resiliently mounted bass reflex enclosure. The amplifier could provide no less than 14W, a massive figure at the time and certainly far more than any other colour television of the period. A headphone socket was also fitted, a new feature made possible because the power supply unit and chassis were fully isolated. Picture performance was not neglected, for as well as B&O’s automatic “permanent colour truth” system the Beovision 8800 featured a light sensor which enabled the contrast to be adjusted automatically as the light falling on the screen changed, making for comfortable viewing under all conditions. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

16 programmes could be pre-tuned using rotary controls concealed behind the upper loudspeaker grille. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

The Beovision 8800 used a chassis that came to be known as the 33XX. This reference came from the type numbers of the sets that used this chassis, most of which started with “33”. The chassis was fully modularised in construction and could be repaired by replacing plug-in units with no soldering being necessary. This design philosophy also allowed upgrades and updates to the design to be made easily as technology changed. One example of this was the receiver panel, which was initially very similar to that of the Beovision 4402 et al but was soon redesigned to take advantage of new integrated circuits and special filters. Another was the colour decoder, which in later sets was revised into an advanced single-chip design. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

The Beovision 8800 used a new type of remote control called the Beovision Video Terminal. This was B&O’s first infra-red remote control for televisions and offered a full set of features including channel selection (direct or step), sound and picture control, control of a teletext decoder and control of a video cassette recorder (such as the Beocord 8800 V). The remote control circuits in the television also displayed the programme number on the screen. This feature had been an option on the more expensive models in the previous range. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

The Beovision 8800 was the most popular model in the 33XX series and sold well. It was replaced in 1984 by the Beovision 8802. Text copyright © Beocentral. Unauthorised reproduction prohibited.

Finishes/ colours

  • Rosewood
  • Teak
  • White1

NOTE 1: special order

Prices

1981£625 
1982£659 
£8281
1983£635 

NOTE 1: with Teletext

Type numbers

3309, 3311, 3312, 3320, 3321, 3331, 3332, 3342, 3351, 3361, 3371, 3372, 3409, 3411, 3412

Further Reading

In print:

On the web: